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Qty*
Price
1.00 - 2.99
$28.47
3.00 - 4.99
$27.47
5.00 - 9.99
$26.47
10.00 - 27.99
$25.87
* For quantities less than 1 ozt./dwt, price will be shown in your cart.
* The price for higher quantity price breaks will appear in your shopping cart.

 *Priced per troy ounce

Sterling Silver #1 Low-Dome Wire, Dead Soft

Item Number: 100701

This sterling silver wire is packaged in coils and can be cut to any length that satisfies the system minimum.
Orders must weigh at least 0.01 ozt.; if you click 'Add to Cart' for a quantity less than this, the cart will offer a prompt to let you know what the minimum for this item is.

Metal type: Sterling silver
Hardness: Dead soft
Form: Wire
Dimensions: 0.608" x0 .077" (15.44 x 1.96mm)
Size no.: 1
Length per weight: 5"/ozt.
Weight per length: 2.4 ozt./ft.
Catalog page: 2015 Gems and Findings & Display and Packaging Catalog p. 9
Country of origin: United States

please note: • Mininum cut is 1". • Due to manufacturing tolerances, please allow for a small amount of variance in weight or dimension when you order sheet and wire products.


How To
How To Prepare Dead-Soft Wire For Use
Before you begin designing with dead-soft wire, make sure the wire is as smooth and kink-free as possible. Here's how to prepare dead-soft wire for use to ensure a smoother result in your designs.

1  Pull your wire through a polishing cloth to smooth out the tiny kinks and wrinkles. Please Note: This process can also work-harden your wire, so easy does it!
2  If you are preparing three or four wires, pull each wire through once, then pull all of them through together once. They will flow in the same direction and will be much easier to sculpt.



How To Heat-Harden Sterling Silver
Here's how to heat-harden sterling silver to increase the strength of the metal and reduce its ductility.
To harden the metal, you will be applying heat to the metal; whenever you apply heat to sterling, surround it with nitrogen, argon or forming gas or cover it with flux to prevent the metal from oxidizing. IMPORTANT: Fine silver cannot be heat-hardened.
This tip is offered here courtesy of Jörg Fischer-Bühner and is reprinted from Santa Fe Symposium® Proceedings, 2003

Step 1
Check the sterling for any solder joints that may already be present.
Step 2
Heat the sterling to 1292°F–1346°F (700°C–730°C) for 30–60 minutes; adjusting temperatures if solder is present (if low-temperature solder is present, heat the piece only to 1000°F–1200°F). Quench in water.
Step 3
Heat the sterling again, this time to 572°F (300°C), holding at that temperature for 30–60 minutes. After cooling, Vickers hardness will range between 120–140dph; if lower temperatures are used, the sterling will not achieve this level.



Annealing Sterling Silver
Learn how to anneal sterling silver, recovering metal that has become work-hardened and leaving the metal more workable.

Step 1
Anneal the sterling silver between 1000°F and 1200°F (537°C and 648°C).
Step 2
Heat the sterling at temperature for 30 to 60 minutes to achieve a Vickers hardness of 66–76dph.
Step 3
Please Note: During annealing, protect the metal against exposure to oxygen by surrounding it with nitrogen, argon or forming gas. If this isn’t possible, protect the metal by covering it with flux contained in a stainless steel pan.



Charts

Brown & Sharpe Gauge Thicknesses

Use this handy guide to quickly, easily and accurately convert gauge sizes into inches or millimeters—or vice versa.

Gauge

Inches

Millimeters

0

.325

8.26

2

.257

6.54

4

.204

5.19

6

.162

4.12

8

.128

3.26

10

.102

2.59

12

.081

2.05

13

.072

1.83

14

.064

1.63

15

.057

1.45

16

.051

1.29

18

.040

1.02

19

.036

.912

20

.032

.812

21

.028

.723

22

.025

.644

23

.023

.573

24

.020

.511

25

.018

.455

26

.016

.405

27

.014

.360

28

.013

.321

29

.011

.286

30

.010

.255

32

.0080

.2019

34

.0063

.1600




Measure Hardness
  Hardness (dph) Rockwell (15T) Tensile (PSI)
 Annealed 50–90 65–71 40,000
1/4-hard 91–100 72–78 40,000
1/2-hard 101–115  79–82 60,000
3/4-hard 116–130 83–85 70,000
Full-hard 131–150 86–88 75,000
Spring hard 175–195 89–93 90,000



Heat-Hardening Sterling Silver

To harden sterling silver, heat it to 600°F (316°C) for 30–50 minutes in a kiln or furnace. Air-cool the sterling silver before pickling. The hardness will be equal to the hardness achieved by cold-working it to a 50% reduction (or ¾-hard). If you want to make your sterling silver harder than ¾-hard, you must physically reduce the cross-sectional area using the chart below.

Rockwell Hardness Common Term Reduction in Cross-Sectional Area
Fine Silver Sterling Silver   Wire Sheet
43 70 Soft (annealed) 0% 0%
65 80 ¼-hard 21% 11%
72 82 ½-hard 37% 21%
74 83 ¾-hard 50% 29%
76 85 Hard 60% 37%
80 87 Spring 84% 60%

Example: If you start with a dead-soft wire and reduce the cross-sectional area by drawing it down 50%, your material will become ¾-hard.




Annealing Sterling Silver

We recommend annealing sterling silver at 1200°F (649°C) to give it the best ductility and grain structure; this applies to both quenched and air-cooled annealing.

Annealing 
Temperature
Quenched Air-Cooled
Scleroscope Rockwell
Hardness
Scleroscope Rockwell
Hardness
 700°F/371°C 23 47 22.5  47
1000°F/538°C 16 42 16 28
1200°F/649°C 14 21 15 24
1300°F/704°C 13* 19* 18 33
1400°F/760°C 12* 18* 20 48

*Quenching is not recommended when annealing at temperatures of 1300°F and above; at such temperatures thermal shock might crack the metal.



Common Conversions

Common Conversions

WEIGHT (MASS) COMPARISON LINEAR MEASURE COMPARISON VOLUME (MEASURE) COMPARISON
Troy to Metric Metric to English Metric to English
1 grain = 0.0648 grams 1 millimeter = 0.03937 inches 1 cubic centimeter = 0.06102 cubic inches
1 pennyweight = 1.5552 grams 1 centimeter = 0.3937 inches 1 cubic meter = 35.315 cubic feet
1 troy ounce = 31.1035 grams 1 meter = 39.37 inches English to Metric
1 troy pound = 373.24 grams 1 kilometer = 0.621 miles 1 cubic inch = 16.387 cubic centimeters
Carat to Metric English to Metric 1 cubic foot = 0.0283 cubic meters
1 grain = 0.0648 grams 1 mil = 0.0254 millimeters 1 cubic yard = 0.7646 cubic meters
1 carat = 200 milligrams 1 inch = 2.54 centimeters 1 cord foot = 0.453 cubic meters
1 point = 2 milligrams 1 foot = 0.3048 meters 1 cord = 3.625 cubic meters
Avoirdupois to Troy 1 yard = 0.9144 meters CAPACITY MEASURE COMPARISON
1 grain= 1 grain 1 rod = 5.029 meters Metric to English
1 ounce Avoir. = 0.91145 troy ounces 1 mile = 1.6093 kilometers 1 milliliter = 0.338 fluid ounces
1 pound Avoir. = 14.5833 troy ounces SURFACE AREA COMPARISON 1 liter = 1.057 liquid quarts or 0.9081 dry quarts
Avoirdupois to Metric Metric to English 1 kiloliter = 264.17 gallons or 28.38 bushels
1 grain = 0.0648 grams 1 sq. centimeter = 0.15499 sq. inches English to Metric (Liquid)
1 ounce Avoir = 28.3495 grams 1 sq. meter = 1.196 sq. yards 1 fluid ounce = 0.0296 liter
1 pound Avoir = 453.59 grams 1 sq. kilometer = 0.386 sq. miles 1 gill = 0.1183 liters
22 pounds Avoir = 1 kilogram English to Metric 1 cup = 0.2366 liters
1 short ton = 907.18 kilograms 1 sq. inch = 6.452 sq. centimeters 1 pint = 0.4732 liters
1 short ton = 0.90718 metric tons 1 sq. foot = 929.03 sq. centimeters 1 quart = 0.9464 liters
1 gallon = 3.7854 liters
Carat to Avoirdupois 1 sq. yard = 0.8361 sq. meters English to Metric (Dry)
1 carat = 0.007 ounces Avoirdupois 1 sq. rod = 25.293 meters 1 pint = 0.5506 liters
    1 quart = 1.1012 liters
    1 peck = 8.8098 liters
    1 bushel = 35.2390 liters
     



Ring Size Comparison Chart
Please Note: All equivalents are approximate.
US. &
Canadian
Standard
Inside
Diameter
mm/inches
Inside
Circumference
mm/inches
Equivalents
British French German Swiss
1 ½ 12.78/.503 40.2/1.580 C 40 ½ 12¾
2 13.21/.520 41.5/1.634 D 41 ½ 13¼ 2
2 ½ 13.61/.536 42.7/1.684 E 42¾ 13¾ 3
3 14.05/.553 44.0/1.739 F 44 14 4
3 ½ 14.45/.569 45.2/1.788 G 45¼ 14 ½
4 14.86/.585 46.5/1.836 H ½ 46 ½ 15 7
4 ½ 15.27/.601 47.8/1.888 I ½ 47¾ 15¼ 8
5 15.70/.618 49.0/1.941 j ½ 49 15¾ 9
5 ½ 16.10/.634 50.2/1.992 L 50¼ 16
6 16.51/.650 51.5/2.042 M 51 ½ 16 ½ 12
6 ½ 16.92/.666 52.8/2.092 N 52¾ 17 13
7 17.35/.683 54.0/2.146 N ½ 54 17¼ 14
7 ½ 17.63/.699 55.3/2.196 O ½ 55 ½ 17 ½ 15
8 18.19/.716 56.6/2.249 P ½ 56¾ 18 16
8 ½ 18.59/.732 57.8/2.300 Q ½ 58 18 ½ 17
9 18.99/.748 59.1/2.350 R ½ 59¼ 19 18
9 ½ 19.41/.764 60.3/2.400 S ½ 60 ½ 19 ½ 19
10 19.84/.781 61.6/2.463 T ½ 61¾ 20 20
10 ½ 20.24/.797 62.8/2.504 U ½ 62¾ 20¼ 22
11 20.68/.814 64.1/2.567 V ½ 64 ½ 20¾ 23
11 ½ 21.01/.830 66.0/2.608 W ½ 66 21 24
12 21.41/.846 67.3/2.658 Y 67¼ 21 ½ 25



Recommended Metal Thickness

We recommend using sterling silver materials that are approximately 20%–25% thicker than the same materials in 14K gold to achieve comparable strength characteristics.
 

For

Use

Rings and wedding bands

16-gauge (for women’s rings)
14-gauge (for men’s rings)

Bezel material

32-, 30-, 28-gauge

Ear wires

22-, 20-gauge

Bracelets

18-, 16-, 14-gauge

Repoussé

24-, 22-gauge

Jump rings

22-, 20-, 18-gauge




Wire Wrapper's Guide to Wire Hardness

This chart is a relative measure for the workability of different alloys for wire-wrapping.

Approximate Ultimate Tensile Strength (psi) Common Term Brown & Sharpe Numbers Hard Reduction in Area of Wire
14K Yellow Gold Yellow Gold-Filled*
Sterling Silver Fine Silver Rich Low Brass Pure Copper
69,000 40,000 40,500 26,000 37,000 33,000 Soft (annealed) 0 0%
88,000 50,000 48,500 33,000 49,000 40,000 ¼-hard 1 21%
98,000 60,000 54,000 41,000 56,000 45,000 ½-hard 2 37%
110,000 70,000 60,000 43,000 62,000 50,000 ¾-hard 3 50%
124,000 75,000 66,500 45,000 68,000 55,000 Full hard 4 60%
145,000 90,000 89,000 51,000 82,000 66,000 Spring Hard 8 84%

*Yellow Gold-Filled (1220,1420)




Comparing Silver Hardnesses
  Vickers Hardness (dph)
Common Term Fine Sterling Argentium
Soft (annealed) 54 66-76 50-70
1/4-hard 62-71 78-88 90-105
1/2-hard 77-89 90-100 106-120
3/4-hard 84-94 102-114 121-135
Hard 89-103 116-130 136-148
Spring 103-108 132-148 150-160
Age-hardened 100-120 100-120